Sat­ur­day, April 1st, 2017, the Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan process was dis­con­tin­ued fol­low­ing a cross-func­tion­al team’s eval­u­a­tion of the BSA’s Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan. While the process is dis­con­tin­ued the pro­gram of the BSA hasn’t changed; no require­ments were changed, just a process was ter­mi­nat­ed.  

As part of the announce­ment, BSA released a Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan Ter­mi­nat­ed FAQ that pro­vides answers to the ques­tions most antic­i­pat­ed by peo­ple using the tool regard­ing the ratio­nale and process for the ter­mi­na­tion. In that FAQ they stat­ed:

The Scout­ing pro­gram, as con­tained in our hand­books and lit­er­a­ture, inher­ent­ly inte­grates safe­ty con­sid­er­a­tions. How­ev­er, no pol­i­cy or pro­ce­dure will replace the review and vig­i­lance of trust­ed adults and lead­ers at the point of pro­gram exe­cu­tion.”

The elim­i­na­tion of the plan itself cuts back on paper­work and process­es for unit lead­ers and com­mit­tees. While reduc­ing com­plex­i­ty, it in no way way reduces our com­mit­ment to safe­ty. They said we expect an, “increase con­sis­ten­cy with the Com­mit­ment to Safe­ty, the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, Risk Assess­ment Strat­e­gy, as well as Camp Stan­dards plan­ning tools.” How­ev­er this changes ” the con­ver­sa­tion, engag­ing every­one in risk-based plan­ning” rather that just going through the process.

The BSA has also, “adopt­ed a flex­i­ble risk assess­ment strat­e­gy for your use.  This is sum­ma­rized in the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, and detailed in the Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment Guide­book.”

With­out the process or Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan doc­u­ment, Scouters will need to be more dili­gent in con­duct­ing, “the Scout­ing pro­gram con­sis­tent with BSA rules, reg­u­la­tions, and poli­cies.” That means know­ing what those reg­u­la­tions are—they are sum­ma­rized in the Guide to Safe Scout­ing and the Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment Guide­book men­tioned above. 

For many, the crutch of the plan seems hard to aban­don, but hav­ing a plan is still part of “Be Pre­pared;” it is inte­gral in our hand­books and  pro­gram lit­er­a­ture. In that lit­er­a­ture, you will find safe­ty fea­tures just as they have always been. The whole idea is to use plan­ning tools like Safe­ty Check­lists, The Sweet 16 of BSA Safe­ty, and Fly­ing Plan as out­li­nes for safe­ty dis­cus­sions and con­ver­sa­tions about risks.

How­ev­er, the pro­gram hasn’t changed. For exam­ple, per­mis­sion from par­ents is still need­ed to take youth on a trip, and pro­gram require­ments for annu­al health and med­ical records for all par­tic­i­pants remain con­sis­tent. The Cub Scouts camp­ing pro­gram is still lim­it­ed to coun­cil approved loca­tions, and so on.

Insurance Questions

Based on ini­tial feed­back, many ques­tions have arisen on insur­ance, but BSA said: “The elim­i­na­tion of the tour and activ­i­ty plan was not dri­ven by insur­ance, or the many myths” and mis­con­cep­tions includ­ing things like hav­ing to file a Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan or be in a field uni­form to have insur­ance. In addi­tion, they said:

…vol­un­teers are pro­vid­ed pri­ma­ry gen­er­al lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance cov­er­age for offi­cial scout­ing activ­i­ties* except when using an auto­mo­bile or water­craft. A volunteer’s (whether reg­is­tered or not) auto­mo­bile lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance is pri­ma­ry with the local coun­cil auto­mo­bile pol­i­cy pro­vid­ing excess auto­mo­bile cov­er­age. Non-reg­is­tered vol­un­teers are pro­vid­ed excess gen­er­al lia­bil­i­ty and auto­mo­bile lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance cov­er­age for offi­cial scout­ing activ­i­ties. There is not a require­ment to fill out a form for cov­er­age.”

*An offi­cial Scout­ing activ­i­ty is defined in the insur­ance pol­i­cy as con­sis­tent with the val­ues, Char­ter and Bylaws, Rules and Reg­u­la­tions, the oper­a­tions man­u­als, and applic­a­ble lit­er­a­ture of the Boy Scouts of Amer­i­ca.

24 comments

  1. Bruce Pyper says:

    This is a wel­come relief for one who has com­plained for years about the paper­work bur­den that tour per­mits have been. I rec­og­nize the need this change cre­ates, for lead­ers to be well trained, to fol­low the guide­li­nes we already have, and to accept the respon­si­bil­i­ty, that real­ly has been ours all along, to oper­ate with­in the safe­ty guide­li­nes. It is kind of like hav­ing to grow up and feel the bur­den of our own deci­sions, with out mom and dad telling us if it is ok or not. I hope it caus­es us to be more care­ful than we have been. There have been too many trag­ic events in the past that a deep­er feel­ing of respon­si­bil­i­ty as lead­ers, may help us to pre­vent going for­ward.
    We can do this. We have been pro­vid­ed with the tools. The tour plan­ning process has given us prac­tice so we know what a good place looks like.
    Many times , I have heard com­ments of frus­tra­tion from lead­ers and boys, over cer­tain activ­i­ties that couldn’t be done. When look­ing closer, the risks involved in them are very sig­nif­i­cant. Stay­ing with in the guide­li­nes keeps everyone’s risk low­er, and has pro­vid­ed a chance to teach restraint by our exam­ple, and good judg­ment to boys.
    We already have the respon­si­bil­i­ty, I hope this change will help us feel it more keen­ly, and let the boys, we work with, see that we are the ones decid­ing to stand up and keep activ­i­ty plans with­in the estab­lished lim­its of safe­ty and risk.
    I think this will be one more vehi­cle for teach­ing boys, that we will­ing to fol­low the scout­ing val­ues we are work­ing to build in them.

  2. Kirk says:

    This is called intent based lead­er­ship. I know many are used to micro­man­age­ment but it is not a good sys­tem. Yes there will be lead­ers that will mess it up, but even under the old sys­tem there were plen­ty. The rules have not changed, safe­ty is still para­mount. The top lev­el lead­ers have just said, we expect­ed and trust you will make it hap­pen with­out me dig­ging into your lives. You know what right looms like. Take care of the boys and even bet­ter, teach the boys to take care of them­selves. That is what scout­ing is all about is it not?

  3. Wendall Dowwneard says:

    With 60 some odd years of scout­ing and hav­ing been in the dis­trict train­ing sec­tion, it was amaz­ing how many scouters were total­ly unaware of the require­ments of the safe scout­ing pub, but also of trip permits,etc. It seems as though any­thing which requires addi­tion­al time such as read­ing or study­ing pub­li­ca­tions “don’t get er done”. I’m sure that those with first class units are not among the cul­prits.

  4. john R says:

    Wow this is sad but I expect noth­ing i have seen many crazy things with LDS scout­ing. I thank god i am no longer with them. I been on priest­hood camp and use BSA insur­ance. Then they Break out shot­guns rifles 308s 45 357 and even ar15s and go as far as let­ting 11 year olds use them. Yes that was time to leave LDS scout­ing. The thing is to know report to high ups and be told my coun­cil needs LDS mon­ey this is sad to watch Sout­ing wash away i have been a ful­ly trained lead­er for over 20 years sad sad sad days ahead .

  5. Kram says:

    I don’t see what the big deal is? I think this is great! Less red tape. Safe­ty has always been 100% up to the lead­ers. For those that have been rely­ing on a piece of paper or an elec­tron­ic one for safe­ty have been miss­ing the boat. Wake up peo­ple! It’s called, “The Guide for Safe Scout­ing”. Try read­ing it and fol­low­ing the guide­li­nes in it. I agree with dar­ryl. Use the tools for plan­ning that are in the back. They have always been there. Wake up and get trained! My rule has always been, “When in doubt, look it up in the GFSC and if it’s not in there ask your DE.” It’s not rock­et sci­ence. It’s called com­mon sense which there is a huge lack of now a days

  6. Lee Ferrin says:

    What will this mean for ensur­ing that our lead­ers are prop­er­ly trained for activ­i­ties? Such as NRA RSO cer­ti­fi­ca­tions for using firearms, or WFA train­ing for back­coun­try activ­i­ties? How can we ensure that this con­tin­ues to hap­pen if they are not being pres­sured to sub­mit plans and proof of train­ing to us? This seems to be a big­ger lia­bil­i­ty in the LDS com­mu­ni­ty than per­haps the tra­di­tion­al scout­ing com­mu­ni­ty. Do we have alter­na­tive tools that we can provide the stakes that wish to have their wards sub­mit­ting trav­el plans to them that have pre­vi­ous­ly used the tour plans? While elim­i­nat­ing paper­work is great, it seems that the paper­work has been removed with­out much in place to replace the ser­vice it pre­vi­ous­ly pro­vid­ed.

    1. Keith says:

      There are oth­er mate­ri­als out there that the LDS Church has come out with that can help if the stake and ward lead­ers want to know what is going on. I feel the heads of the orga­ni­za­tions should know exact­ly what is allowed, through the Guide for Safe Scout­ing, and stop pre­tend­ing there is a dif­fer­ence between the Scout­ing and Church activ­i­ties. In my pre­vi­ous stake, we had many wards not fol­low­ing the guide­li­nes so the stake pres­i­den­cy imple­ment­ed the Activ­i­ty Plan work­sheet that is found on lds.org. https://www.lds.org/bc/content/shared/content/english/pdf/callings/young-men/activity-plan.pdf . All activ­i­ties which includ­ed leav­ing stake bound­aries, it was a lit­tle exces­sive, had to have the youth feel out the Activ­i­ty Plan for approval. If not approved then the activ­i­ty could not take place. Our stake pres­i­den­cy required all the infor­ma­tion be given about the event. If rules were not fol­lowed, like the NRA and RSO cer­ti­fi­ca­tions then the activ­i­ty did not hap­pen or a request would come back for more infor­ma­tion.
      The tools are there. It comes down to whether or not the head of the unit wants to learn and fol­low the rules already in place. The unit heads should know what is going on in their unit and only allow those activ­i­ties that are in accor­dance with the BSA poli­cies take place. But that would require them to be trained and that is anoth­er dis­cus­sion in and of itself.

    2. Darryl Alder
      Darryl Alder ( User Karma: 7 ) says:

      Lee you asked

      What will this mean for ensur­ing that our lead­ers are prop­er­ly trained for activ­i­ties? Such as NRA RSO cer­ti­fi­ca­tions for using firearms, or WFA train­ing for back­coun­try activ­i­ties?”

      The answer was in the blog post: “Be Pre­pared;” it is inte­gral in our hand­books and pro­gram lit­er­a­ture. In that lit­er­a­ture, you will find safe­ty fea­tures just as they have always been. The whole idea is to use plan­ning tools like Safe­ty Check­lists, The Sweet 16 of BSA Safe­ty, and Fly­ing Plan as out­li­nes for safe­ty dis­cus­sions and con­ver­sa­tions about risks.” A unit lead­er that does not abide by those require­ments my find them­selves out­side of Scout­ing.

      How can we ensure that this con­tin­ues to hap­pen if they are not being pres­sured to sub­mit plans and proof of train­ing to us? 

      For the last three years no one has had to give us any proof. This belongs to the unit key three. If they are unsure of an activ­i­ty, they can advance their con­cerns to your dis­trict Health and Safe­ty offi­cer, if s/he is con­cerned and advances it to the Coun­cil Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment Com­mit­tee we will ask if the activ­i­ty is in our lit­er­a­ture and if they have used the check­lists in the Guide to Safe Scout­ing and the Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment Guide­book. If our team has con­cerns we can call Nation­al who will ask the same ques­tions. Sim­ply stat­ed, Scout safe­ty is on the shoul­ders of the unit Key 3. 

      This seems to be a big­ger lia­bil­i­ty in the LDS com­mu­ni­ty than per­haps the tra­di­tion­al scout­ing com­mu­ni­ty. Do we have alter­na­tive tools that we can provide the stakes that wish to have their wards sub­mit­ting trav­el plans to them that have pre­vi­ous­ly used the tour plans? 

      The tools for plan­ning are in the back of the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, they include plan­ning tools like Safe­ty Check­lists, The Sweet 16 of BSA Safe­ty, and Fly­ing Plan, but have been there for plan­ning for a long time. The old Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan was an excuse to not use the full plan­ning tools in our lit­er­a­ture. Your Dis­trict train­ing com­mit­tee will need to teach safe­ty and activ­i­ty plan­ning at Round­table and in oth­er set­tings to get the word out.

      While elim­i­nat­ing paper­work is great, it seems that the paper­work has been removed with­out much in place to replace the ser­vice it pre­vi­ous­ly pro­vid­ed.

      The online steps were a bur­den accord­ing to s cross-func­tion­al team that com­plet­ed an eval­u­a­tion of the BSA’s Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan, result­ing in a rec­om­men­da­tion to ter­mi­nate the plan effec­tive April 1, 2017 (see Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan Ter­mi­nat­ed FAQ). This lets us all focus on know­ing what is con­tained in our hand­book and oth­er lit­er­a­ture, much of which was being over­looked in the past.

  7. Jungleboy says:

    I am sad to see BSA aban­don­ing so many of its once good prac­tices. The­se plans are essen­tial to insure that each activ­i­ty and youth are pro­tect­ed to their best abil­i­ty. As the late Dr. Cov­ey stat­ed in his 7 Habits of High­ly Effec­tive Peo­ple Sem­i­nars and book, “a plan that is not writ­ten is only a “dream””…in oth­er words, with­out Activ­i­ty and Trip Plans, BSA is only hop­ing that secu­ri­ty will be pro­vid­ed for each Activ­i­ty and Trek. Even the best of out­doors­man file a Trip Plan before ven­tur­ing into the out of doors! This is anoth­er fool­ish move by BSA, and not sure why they con­tin­ue to low­er their stan­dards.

  8. Ken Best says:

    I have checked with sev­er­al Scouters, this is the real deal. Let’s do all we can to get the mes­sage out. Let’s also remind every­one about the Safe­ty com­mit­ment we all have to one anoth­er. Safe Scout­ing every­one!

  9. Kimberly says:

    This is not a Joke. You can see the fol­low­ing on my.scouting.org and look under Tour Per­mits.
    Home > Scout­ing Safe­ly > Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan Ter­mi­nat­ed FAQ
    Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan Ter­mi­nat­ed FAQ

    A cross-func­tion­al team has com­plet­ed an eval­u­a­tion of the BSA’s Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan, result­ing in a rec­om­men­da­tion to ter­mi­nate the plan effec­tive April 1, 2017.
    The fol­low­ing FAQ pro­vides answers to the ques­tions we antic­i­pate most peo­ple using the tool might have regard­ing the ratio­nale and process for the ter­mi­na­tion.
    We rec­om­mend that you sign up for the week­ly Scout­ing­Wire newslet­ters to ensure that you receive updates direct­ly in your inbox.
    Q. Why are you ter­mi­nat­ing the plan? What does this mean for me, my unit, coun­cil and the Scout­ing fam­i­ly?
    A. The Scout­ing pro­gram, as con­tained in our hand­books and lit­er­a­ture, inher­ent­ly inte­grates safe­ty con­sid­er­a­tions. How­ev­er, no pol­i­cy or pro­ce­dure will replace the review and vig­i­lance of trust­ed adults and lead­ers at the point of pro­gram exe­cu­tion. We expect that the elim­i­na­tion of the BSA Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan will:
    Reduce com­plex­i­ty, cut­ting back on process­es and paper­work for unit lead­ers.
    Increase con­sis­ten­cy with the Com­mit­ment to Safe­ty, the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, Risk Assess­ment Strat­e­gy, as well as Camp Stan­dards plan­ning tools.
    Change the con­ver­sa­tion, engag­ing every­one in risk-based plan­ning vs. process.
    Elim­i­nate pro­cess­ing, free­ing staff to focus on mem­ber­ship and remov­ing admin­is­tra­tive bur­den.
    In addi­tion to the above rea­sons, the BSA has adopt­ed a flex­i­ble risk assess­ment strat­e­gy for your use. This is sum­ma­rized in the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, and detailed in the Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment Guide­book .
    Q. What is the new process?
    A. There is no required process, Scouters are remind­ed to con­duct the Scout­ing pro­gram con­sis­tent with BSA rules, reg­u­la­tions, and poli­cies. Flex­i­ble risk assess­ment tools are sum­ma­rized in the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, and detailed in the Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment Guide­book .
    Q. Will there be a replace­ment for the Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan?
    A. No.
    Q. Will the entire activ­i­ty plan idea go away?
    A. No, hav­ing a plan is part of “Be Pre­pared”. Plan­ning is inte­gral into the pro­gram lit­er­a­ture.
    Q. What will this mean for con­sid­er­ing safe­ty on the­se out­ings?
    A. The Scout­ing pro­gram, as con­tained in our hand­books and lit­er­a­ture, inte­grates many safe­ty fea­tures. How­ev­er, no pol­i­cy or pro­ce­dure will replace the review and vig­i­lance of trust­ed adults and lead­ers at the point of pro­gram exe­cu­tion. Source: Com­mit­ment to Safe­ty
    Q. Will units have to file any trip forms of any kind? Is there any REQUIRED noti­fi­ca­tion to coun­cil for trips?
    A. No, how­ev­er the BSA Pro­gram includes sev­er­al plan­ning tools (Check­lists, The Sweet 16 of BSA Safe­ty, Fly­ing Plan) which are designed not for “fil­ing” but to prompt dis­cus­sions / con­ver­sa­tions about risks.
    Q. Does this include Learn­ing for Life and Explor­ing?
    A. Yes, the man­u­al process used by Learn­ing for Life and Explor­ing is also dis­con­tin­ued.
    Q. When does this go in effect?
    A. The ter­mi­na­tion of the plan is effec­tive on April 1, 2017.
    Q. Is the change sim­ply — Don’t have to fill out a Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan any­more? All the oth­er steps are the same?
    A. The pro­gram hasn’t changed. For exam­ple, per­mis­sion from par­ents is still need­ed to take youth on a trip, as would be pro­gram require­ments for annu­al health and med­ical records for all par­tic­i­pants. The Cub Scouts camp­ing pro­gram is still lim­it­ed to coun­cil approved loca­tions, and so on.
    Q. Has all lit­er­a­ture been updat­ed to reflect this change?
    A. Key doc­u­ments are either updat­ed or in the process of being updat­ed. Oth­er lit­er­a­ture will be updat­ed in the nor­mal revi­sion cycle so it may take sev­er­al years to com­plete. If you find some­thing to be updat­ed feel free to let us know with the “Got Ques­tions” link to the left.
    Insur­ance Ques­tions
    Based on ini­tial feed­back, many ques­tions have arisen on insur­ance. The elim­i­na­tion of the tour and activ­i­ty plan was not dri­ven by insur­ance, or the many myths / mis­con­cep­tions includ­ing “…you have to file a Tour and Activ­i­ty Plan, and / or be in a field uni­form to have insur­ance…” sur­round­ing insur­ance. The fol­low­ing insur­ance relat­ed FAQ’s and sources are offered.
    Q. Will the lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance pol­i­cy still provide cov­er­age if a tour and activ­i­ty plan is no longer required?
    A. Yes. Reg­is­tered vol­un­teers are pro­vid­ed pri­ma­ry gen­er­al lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance cov­er­age for offi­cial scout­ing activ­i­ties except when using an auto­mo­bile or water­craft. A volunteer’s (whether reg­is­tered or not) auto­mo­bile lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance is pri­ma­ry with the local coun­cil auto­mo­bile pol­i­cy pro­vid­ing excess auto­mo­bile cov­er­age. Non-reg­is­tered vol­un­teers are pro­vid­ed excess gen­er­al lia­bil­i­ty and auto­mo­bile lia­bil­i­ty insur­ance cov­er­age for offi­cial scout­ing activ­i­ties. Link. There is not a require­ment to fill out a form for cov­er­age.
    Q. What is an offi­cial scout­ing activ­i­ty?
    A. An offi­cial scout­ing activ­i­ty is defined in the insur­ance pol­i­cy as con­sis­tent with the val­ues, Char­ter and Bylaws, Rules and Reg­u­la­tions, the oper­a­tions man­u­als, and applic­a­ble lit­er­a­ture of the Boy Scouts of Amer­i­ca. Link.

  10. Bill says:

    The Trip Plan was a won­der­ful tool for doc­u­ment­ing essen­tial infor­ma­tion and ensur­ing that the right peo­ple had a copy. Anoth­er bad deci­sion by the BSA lead­er­ship.

  11. Robert Starling says:

    I don’t know .… I’m still sus­pi­cious of any­thing so rad­i­cal being pub­lished on April Fool’s Day!
    The TAP site doesn’t say any­thing about abol­ish­ing the Tour Plan.

  12. Joe Heman says:

    I am total­ly dis­ap­point­ed as a scout lead­er. I reli­gious­ly used tour plans even when we were in coun­cil and less than 500 miles to orga­nize, ver­i­fy seat belts, train­ing, home bound con­tacts had a detailed plan, sent them an email when filed — you took all of the­se tools away from me in one con­ve­nient pack­age. Any plans to release the appli­ca­tion so that it can be used as part of Scout­book or Troop­mas­ter to use as an app — I will miss this great­ly as it made me do all the men­tal check­list items and drove me through it auto­mat­i­cal­ly includ­ing mak­ing sure the guide to safe scout­ing was in the truck before we left. 🙁 🙁

    Joe Heman
    Scout­mas­ter Troop 17
    Roy, Utah

    1. Darryl Alder
      Darryl Alder ( User Karma: 7 ) says:

      They are not, but safe­ty dili­gence is. You will need to use the tools for plan­ning that are in the back of the Guide to Safe Scout­ing, they include plan­ning tools like Safe­ty Check­lists, The Sweet 16 of BSA Safe­ty, and Fly­ing Plan.

  13. Dilworth Brinton Jr. District Scribe says:

    No it is not an April Fools Joke but almost some­thing worse.
    My Coun­cil sent the infor­ma­tion to my dis­trict 10 days before the release date. Coun­cil want­ed the Dis­trict to take charge of dis­tri­b­u­tion to EVERYONE. We refused! We can­not be liable for some­one not get­ting infor­ma­tion on this impor­tant and major change. We don’t have everyone’s e-mail address­es (but the coun­cil does as they send out blast e-mails, most­ly about events that coun­cil makes mon­ey on, at least sev­er­al time each week. The Dis­trict has NO sys­tem of get­ting this infor­ma­tion to the reg­is­tered scouters and appar­ent­ly nei­ther does the coun­cil.
    When I called to get infor­ma­tion or guid­ance I got noth­ing. Coun­cil said that they had noth­ing to do with this and knew noth­ing about it, oth­er than the sheet of Fre­quent­ly Answered Ques­tions sent to them by Nation­al.
    When asked about pro­vid­ing safe­ty lead­er­ship for cam­porees, con­fer­ences, sem­i­nars, and uni­ver­si­ty of Scout­ing (on page 4) they had no answers.
    On page 6 coun­cil is to “‘Devel­op and man­age a cadre of instruc­tors and train­ers .… the coun­cil (will help) devel­op and imple­ment the­se cours­es, and sup­port youth and lead­er aware­ness of safe­ty con­cerns and risk avoid­ance”, they had NO answers, NO instruc­tions and NO infor­ma­tion. I had to show them where this instruc­tion to them was con­tained in the hand­book!
    The Enter­prise Risk Man­age­ment hand­book has almost NOTHING that helps the unit lev­el activ­i­ty to do any­thing of the actions that they are sup­posed to do. The hand­book is for coun­cil and dis­trict.
    Coun­cil sug­gest­ed that I e-mail my ques­tions and con­cerns to Nation­al for answers. They either would not or could not even answer basic ques­tions, oth­er than to refer me (and oth­ers) to the two page announce­ment sent out my nation­al.
    Absolute­ly ter­ri­ble mess of the release and expla­na­tion by nation­al and as far as I can see, no plan­ning for the future. What is their risk? less infor­ma­tion sent to vol­un­teers, leav­ing them in a vac­u­um which will only cause greater lia­bil­i­ty for nation­al and the pro­gram.
    who got paid for this poor pro­gram pre­sen­ta­tion????

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